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Youngstown – S [M] L XL – Urban Decay

Youngstown is located in the Rust Belt.  There is an effort by a few to bring vibrancy to the community, some more effort by those seeking to help the hurting here and now.  Much more research can be done on my part to learn what can be done to make it once again a thriving community –  the expectations and identity need to change, then more public space, influence, and advocacy. Here is a taste of the disrepair we have fallen victim to, commonly known as urban blight or urban decay.

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So you’re graduating from architecture school…

Many young people do not have a meaning and purpose to their life. They’re looking to say, does my life matter? Do I have a unique contribution to make… when you recognize that you have a real mission, an indispensable contribution to make, then you embrace life, you celebrate life in a completely different way. – Anna Halpine, The Human Experience I was right in the middle of my thesis while obtaining my Master of Architecture degree, at the interstice of theoretical research, experimentation, and real (” “) design. It was wintertime last year that I dedicated a good Saturday afternoon to post-graduate endeavors. A few things I knew were certain: I was about to have substantial debt to deal with. CLICK for more

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Youngstown [S] M L XL

Youngstown, Ohio. The Rust Belt. As seen from photographs past and first-hand accounts from one and two generations before my time, the city used to be a happening place, with popular stores, an active downtown, rich folk, popular entertainers, everything one needs for a little gem of a city to call home. The Youngstown I grew up in was littered with tales of political corruption, a failed steel industry, and frankly not much reason do go downtown – so I rarely ever did.  Yes, you could say that makes me a suburbanite. But here we are, in the 21st century, looking at our ‘old’ cities (Europeans may laugh) and reexamining what can be done.  This is from many perspectives and CLICK for more

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From Tipi to Skyscraper: A History of Women in Architecture – book review

The point is not that women are more likely than their male counterparts to have found the answers to the difficult issues confronting the profession of architecture, but that perhaps they are raising some new and different questions which are pertinent to its future. -Doris Cole As mentioned in the previous post, I recently completed reading the succinct history of women in America and their role in their built environment in Doris Cole’s From Tipi to Skyscraper.  This book, written in 1973, speaks of a rather linear, yet not progressive, evolving role of women in the public sphere and civil sectors of work, from Native Americans, female pioneers, the age of domesticity, a transition to the public sphere in wartime, CLICK for more

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Women, America, & the Architecture Profession

It wasn’t until I spent a year as a Construction Volunteer Lead with Habitat for Humanity that I truly noticed a disparity in the treatment of men and women in the field of built environment.  It was the rare off-hand comment, such as how sexy women look with power tools, or a general disregard for our authority in the given situation that heated my blood and produced a deluge of questions – am I not confident enough? should I voice my feelings of disrespect?  am I being overly sensitive about the situation?  In my graduate studies, this newfound realization led me to understand our gender treatments much more, mostly through a women’s studies class, that disentangled gender roles and expectations, CLICK for more

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Resumé what? Distinction within a tough job market in architecture.

Architecture shines as the top unemployed profession for 2012, estimated at just under 14%. Sure, there are reasons for this within the industry, without, globally, and historically. But as part of that 14%, a recent graduate with all of the world to aspire to, why is the only worth my future employers can see abbreviated to a single page, my beloved resumé? That single page is critiqued, being too formal for some, too playful for others.  What kind of job are looking for, anyway?  What are you ambitions?  What can you do for us? I recently applied to a dream job – public work, great city, respected firm – along with 500 others.  While I am proud of building up CLICK for more

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Public Interest Design Institute training – d.II

I recall the fateful afternoon after my first day interning in San Francisco, when looking for my car, and my heart drops.  It’s been towed.  Forty-five minutes of looking for a spot around Panhandle Park on a Sunday evening and I thought I finally found one – it ends up it was in front of a driveway leading to a home addition, complete with a bay window, blocking any obvious trace of former garage to a desperate spot-seeker.  So according to the group hanging out on the stoop, their landlord had my car towed. End scene. Enter, a sunny Cincinnati November morning, east of campus, with a shiny parking spot waiting just for me.  There are reasons to appreciate our CLICK for more

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Public Interest Design Institute training – d.I – pt.II

On to Emilie Taylor with the Tulane City Center. Emilie presented an important facet to public interest design, which I was surely not the only one interested in: funding. How does one receive funding for a project that does not exist? Bryan also found the topic of urgent importance and reiterated Emilie’s funding model.  Basically, it goes schematic design –> prove it is feasible through this design, receive funding –> pay architect for stamped, developed drawings.

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Public Interest Design Institute training – d.I – pt.I

Starting out our conference was design activist Bryan Bell, the founder and facilitator of Design Corps, the Public Interest Design Institute, and co-founder of SEED.  Some highlights of his comments are as follows. While most projects within the for-profit design field cater to 10% of the population, we need to seek good design for 100%. “every issue is a design issue” – this relates well to a quote Maurice Cox later brought up by Thomas Jefferson: “Design activity and political thought are indivisible.” As architects, as designers, we need to address a greater range of projects and offer a larger scope of services. Ideally, a design solution will address and solve multiple issues.  For example, the Tsunami-Safe(r) House by a CLICK for more